See/download the final papers at Taylor & Francis Online (subscription required)
See/download the pre-publication open access versions below.

  • Dirk J. Steenbergen & Leontine E. Visser: Caught Between Mediation and Local Dependence: Understanding the Role of Non-government Organisations in Co-management of Coastal Resources in Eastern Indonesia
  • C. Banwell, M. Kelly, J. Dixon, S-A. Seubsman & A. Sleigh: Trust: The Missing Dimension in the Food Retail Transition in Thailand
  • Jared Mackley-Crump: From Private Performance to the Public Stage: Reconsidering ‘Staged Authenticity’ and ‘Traditional’ Performances at the Pasifika Festival
  • Monika Winarnita: The Not-so-gentle Makassarese Fan Dance: Misperformance Challenging Indonesian-Australian Transnational Femininity

 

 

Dirk J. Steenbergen & Leontine E. Visser

D.J. Steenbergen
Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods (RIEL), Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, and North Australia Marine Research Alliance, Arafura Timor Research Facility, Darwin, Australia

L.E. Visser
Emeritus Professor of Rural Development Sociology at Wageningen University, The Netherlands

Caught Between Mediation and Local Dependence: Understanding the Role of Non-government Organisations in Co-management of Coastal Resources in Eastern Indonesia

pages 115-137

Resolving contestations over resource management rights around coastal villages remains a focal challenge for co-management initiatives in remote coastal zones. Contemporary socio-political settings increasingly see local people having to negotiate between local long-standing (horizontal) relationships and new emerging (vertical) relationships which involve collaborations with outside actors who try to assume neutral mediating positions. Using two conflicts, this article examines the rise and fall of a participatory coastal resource management program in eastern Indonesia involving a fishing community engaged in a co-management arrangement with a conservation non-government organisation (NGO). An actor-oriented approach is applied to analyse how these conflicts shape, drive and direct collaborations across the community–NGO interface. We discuss how these impact the implementation of the conservation ethics and sustainable natural resource management practices, and show how particular mediating capacities of an NGO may overcome, and even build forth on, conflict in some contexts but fall short in others. We argue that local resource user groups and conservation teams operate according to strong local relationships that are entrenched in cultural–historical hierarchies of power. We moreover note that these local relationships significantly influence the extent of neutrality of external groups in their mediating, coordinating and technical advisory roles. The effectiveness of co-management partnerships hinges on the ability to balance actors’ mediating capacity with their local dependence for operation.

 


C. Banwell, M. Kelly, J. Dixon, S-A. Seubsman & A. Sleigh

C. Banwell, M. Kelly, J. Diwon & A. Sleigh
National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra Australia

S-A. Seubsman
Sukhothai Thammithirat Open University, Nonthaburi, Thailand

Trust: The Missing Dimension in the Food Retail Transition in Thailand

pages 138-154

Thailand has experienced dramatic growth of large national and international modern food retailers, such as supermarkets, hypermarkets and convenience stores in large cities and regional centres in the last two decades. Nevertheless, Thai consumers continue to purchase perishables (fruits, vegetables and animal products) from fresh markets (wet markets, talat sot) contradicting predictions from analysts that modern food retail chains will rapidly replace fresh markets as the preferred venue for purchasing all types of foods. This paper examines trust in food retail systems as an under-explored dimension lying behind the continued patronage by Thais of fresh markets to purchase perishable items. It derives from a research program commenced in 2005 that includes fieldwork visits, interviews and questionnaires. In the context of the Thai food retail transition, we propose that trust affects relationships between consumers and (1) individual fresh market-based vendors, (2) the food products sold at fresh markets and (3) the food retail system more broadly. If fresh markets can be maintained in the face of sustained pressure from modern national and international food retailers, Thais will continue to use them. Meanwhile, trust is a relatively unrecognised dimension that is supporting the continued existence of traditional food retail formats.


Jared Mackley-Crump

Auckland University of Technology
Auckland, New Zealand

From Private Performance to the Public Stage: Reconsidering ‘Staged Authenticity’ and ‘Traditional’ Performances at the Pasifika Festival 

pages 155-176

Over the past 60 years, the phenomenal growth of international tourism has been paralleled by the phenomenal growth in festivals held across the world and the increasing academic attention given to understanding them. Performances of culture in tourist settings are often viewed as inauthentic, staged purely for the benefit of tourists. This article contests this enduring perspective, best known through the notion of ‘staged authenticity’. Drawing on research conducted in the diasporic Pacific festival space in New Zealand, this article focuses on how those from within Pacific communities view their performances. Giving agency to the actors allows them to define performances and festivals from an emic perspective, and this challenges the notion of staged authenticity. Rather than material performed purely for the festival and its cultural tourists, performances instead represent a movement of material from largely homogenous community contexts into the multicultural public sphere. Furthermore, the notion of nonlinear temporal relations shows how these performance traditions function contemporaneously, as an important component of the community repertoires from which they come. This in particular challenges the idea that touristic performances represent ‘staged authenticity’. Rather, traditional musics represent one way in which diasporic Pacific communities authentically stage themselves.

 


Monika Winarnita

Department of Anthropology, Victoria University, British Columbia, Canada
Department of Anthropology, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

The Not-so-gentle Makassarese Fan Dance: Misperformance Challenging Indonesian-Australian Transnational Femininity

pages 177-195

In the hands of a group of Indonesian female dancers in Perth, Western Australia, a gentle sea breeze or Angin Maimiri was recreated through the use of swaying fans. The Indonesian women's own newly choreographed dance or tari kreasi is based on the Makassarese traditional song of the same name from South Sulawesi. The women had intended to perform the dance in a ‘feminine’ manner with soft graceful movements. Yet, as illustrated in the ethnographic account of mistakes and misinterpretations that happened at the performance, as well as purposeful adaptations by the dancers, ideals of femininity are not simply transferred in a transnational context; they become inadvertently challenged. Angin Mamiri, as danced in an ‘un-feminine’ manner by an Indonesian housewife hobby group, is illustrative of who they are as marriage migrants and their often marginalised position in their diasporic community. This article is inspired by misperformance ethnography [Prendergast 2014, “Misperformance Ethnography.” Applied Theatre Research 2 (1): 77–90] of what is revealed about ideals held by those involved in a performance when mistakes and misinterpretations happen. Using an anthropology of performance approach thus provides a novel analysis at the intersection of migration and gender studies of how gender ideals such as femininity can be challenged through dance performance in a transnational context.